Hamilton Truck Route Master Plan Review

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The Hamilton Truck Route Master Plan (TRMP) is a comprehensive review and update of the 2010 TRMP and current truck route network. The Study will recognize and minimize the impact of truck traffic over the interests of the greater community while supporting Hamilton’s economic prosperity through developing an efficient and reliable network for goods movement. The Study will develop, evaluate and recommend alternative truck route networks, as well as supporting policies and tools that the City can consider to mitigate current challenges and help manage potential challenges in the future.

Project Background

The City of Hamilton is recognized as a goods movement gateway between Southern Ontario and international markets as a result of the goods movement corridors (rail lines, highways) and intermodal freight facilities (airport, port, rail yards) that exist in Hamilton. Trucks also support the quality of life for residents and the economic vitality of local businesses by transporting goods - such as consumer items, industry components and products, construction equipment and materials - to, from and within Hamilton. Trucks also remove waste products and support services that enhance neighbourhood livability. However, because of their increased size and weight and potential safety and environmental impacts, the movement of trucks needs special consideration. A truck route network is one tool to help manage the movement of trucks in Hamilton.

The most recent review of the truck route network was completed as part of the Truck Route Master Plan, which was approved by City Council in 2010. Issues with the 2010 truck route network, and new policy influences have emerged, that are leading to challenges with the truck route network, including:

  • The environment and Hamilton’s climate emergency declaration
  • Public health, social equity, and roadway safety (Vision Zero)
  • Network connectivity and area-specific issues
  • Growth in new employment areas (e.g. Airport Employment Growth District, Red Hill Business Park) and encroachment on rural area
  • Emerging truck technologies and policies.

The current Truck Route Master Plan review and refinement will be based on alignment with:

  • The City’s strategic plan vision, objectives and desired outcomes
  • Health and well-being of the community
  • Feedback, needs and lived experiences of stakeholders and the public
  • Emerging technologies and goods movement policies

The Hamilton Truck Route Master Plan (TRMP) is a comprehensive review and update of the 2010 TRMP and current truck route network. The Study will recognize and minimize the impact of truck traffic over the interests of the greater community while supporting Hamilton’s economic prosperity through developing an efficient and reliable network for goods movement. The Study will develop, evaluate and recommend alternative truck route networks, as well as supporting policies and tools that the City can consider to mitigate current challenges and help manage potential challenges in the future.

Project Background

The City of Hamilton is recognized as a goods movement gateway between Southern Ontario and international markets as a result of the goods movement corridors (rail lines, highways) and intermodal freight facilities (airport, port, rail yards) that exist in Hamilton. Trucks also support the quality of life for residents and the economic vitality of local businesses by transporting goods - such as consumer items, industry components and products, construction equipment and materials - to, from and within Hamilton. Trucks also remove waste products and support services that enhance neighbourhood livability. However, because of their increased size and weight and potential safety and environmental impacts, the movement of trucks needs special consideration. A truck route network is one tool to help manage the movement of trucks in Hamilton.

The most recent review of the truck route network was completed as part of the Truck Route Master Plan, which was approved by City Council in 2010. Issues with the 2010 truck route network, and new policy influences have emerged, that are leading to challenges with the truck route network, including:

  • The environment and Hamilton’s climate emergency declaration
  • Public health, social equity, and roadway safety (Vision Zero)
  • Network connectivity and area-specific issues
  • Growth in new employment areas (e.g. Airport Employment Growth District, Red Hill Business Park) and encroachment on rural area
  • Emerging truck technologies and policies.

The current Truck Route Master Plan review and refinement will be based on alignment with:

  • The City’s strategic plan vision, objectives and desired outcomes
  • Health and well-being of the community
  • Feedback, needs and lived experiences of stakeholders and the public
  • Emerging technologies and goods movement policies

Virtual Public Information Centre #2

Thank you to all who attended our virtual PIC #2 on June 24, 2021. If you missed the meeting, you can watch the video.

 

PIC#2 Presentation materials

Once you have reviewed these items and/or attended the Virtual PIC, please Provide Your Comments.

Do you have a question about this project?

All questions will be collected and staff will do their best to answer during the Virtual PIC. Answers will be posted to this website after the meeting. 

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    If Vision Zero is a goal - for our children’s safety and the safety of the other children on Millgrove Sideroad (in our case - north of 5th concession west and south of the lights on Hwy 6 and 6th concession east) how can this goal be reached? We all know in the future there will be lights put in at Hwy 5 and Millgrove Sideroad and the cloverleaf of Hwy 6 and Hwy 5 is going to greatly impact the amount of ALL traffic on our road. This is a very scary future reality for all families living on Millgrove Sideroad. Thank you for your time.

    Nik asked about 1 year ago

    Safety is a top priority for the City and for this study. This study will strive to balance the needs of the business industry and the community by developing a safe, reliable and efficient truck route network. At this stage no decision has been made on the network type and route selection. Route selection will be dealt with in stage 2 and 3 of the project. The alternatives, and the draft recommendations, will be presented through Phase 2 of the Stakeholder Engagement, and presented for input and discussion. Members of the public will have the opportunity to review and comment on the proposed network and specific routes in the network.

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    How can we decrease the number of large trucks traveling through the village of Millgrove? I live near the 4-way stop in 'downtown' Millgrove and am concerned with the continuous line of huge trucks that pass by the local church, public school, daycare and general store on a daily basis. (As I sit here typing, 2 tanker trucks, 4 dump trucks and an 18-wheeler have gone by in a short 7 minute time span. Ridiculous! ) There are cyclists, pedestrians, dog walkers and parents pushing young children in strollers all travelling along a 'major truck route.' That does not make sense to me. Please help to keep our little community safe by removing the excessive trucks on the 5th Concession West, through Millgrove. Thanks.

    A concerned Mom in Millgrove asked about 1 year ago

    Safety is paramount for the City and for this study. At this stage, no decision has been on specific route selections. Route selection will be dealt with in phase 2 and 3 of the study. The alternatives, and the draft recommendations, will be presented through Phase 2 of the Stakeholder Engagement, and presented for input and discussion. Public and stakeholders will have the opportunity to voice their concerns and opinions about the specific routes in the network.

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    About the issue of Enforcement again. We battled 3 years to have our area designated as a non-truck route. Enforcement is a big issue. There are only so many police resources to handle this and you have to be at the right place at the right time. Given the technology available, is there any possibility of something similar to a 407 type of device, to actually have something where there is something that is registered, so that if you should be on a truck route you need to have device on the dashboard, and if you go off the truck route, you get fined? We can designate accordingly around the city but if we don’t have the ability to stop the trucks from going where they shouldn’t it doesn’t matter. We know in our area we are getting trucks constantly on non-truck designated streets.

    Asked at PIC-1 asked 11 months ago

    A truck enforcement approach as you described needs to be holistically provided, with the necessary legislation passed by the province. Hopefully, electronic logging devices increase truck route compliance. We are trying to educate ourselves as there are specific discussions going on with the province about the truck enforcement. The municipality has limited resources to mandate all trucks in the province or entering the City to use this type of tracking devices. 

    However, there is the matter of local deliveries: if all trucks are supposed to travel along designated truck routes only, they would be punished as soon as they get off the truck route to use a direct route to a local delivery. We are looking at practical solutions, at finding a balance between local goods deliveries and general safety and the enforcement component. We are looking into various options. We are just at the beginning of major emerging changes in goods movement technologies, not just for enforcement but also reducing environmental impacts of trucking, e.g. electric trucks and platooning. We are working with stakeholders to determine how to be the early adopters of all of these technologies.

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    What is the criteria for restricting engine braking? Can a sign be requested or does it depend on the road design?

    Asked at PIC-1 asked 11 months ago

    The general rule of thumb is that trucks shouldn’t use the engine brakes in all areas to come to a full stop except where necessary for safety reasons. Regulations are clear on where to use or not use engine brakes, and where can signs be used. The City has installed various signs based on noise concerns from members of the public and community. The Ontario Traffic Manual provides clear criteria and we look to those criteria. Staff conduct field studies, observe and check the feasibility of installing the “Avoid Engine Brake” signs and if warranted, a sign will be installed.

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    You mentioned a Technical Advisory group. Are there any other large groups across the Hamilton area like school boards, hospitals, academic institutions e.g. McMaster, that you are looking at receiving greater input from? Mac does have students on campus in various neighbourhoods. Timelines: The online survey open to Sept 11. What does the policy development timeline look like, and how will people be informed about other input opportunities?

    Asked at PIC-1 asked 11 months ago

    Various groups have been part of engagement so far, including the groups you mentioned, and can provide comments regarding the study any time.

    Organizations can also provide input via the online survey, and can please specify the organization that they are representing in their response.

    Study timelines are posted on the study webpage. Roughly and tentatively the study will follow that timeframe. COVID impacts timing. In terms of how people will be informed: we use newspaper ads, social media, emails can be added to the project contact list, we are reaching out to ward councillors and constituency offices and they have been very helpful in disseminating information to ward residents. We are using any tools available to inform public and stakeholders about the process. We have communicated through the above channels to date for this phase of consultation.

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    Is Millgrove Sideroad noted as a problem area? The importance of enforcement: - Plans, maps and signs don’t stop the trucks - Laws and policies do not result in compliance on their own. - Our road has been dealing with this issue for decades. - We still have over 100 trucks daily (2018) Millgrove: -Have yet to see a truck pilled over - Have see the same trucks daily - Have spoked to drivers - Could elaborate on Automated Enforcement? - Is there a war to get traction on enfrocement for our road?

    Asked at PIC-1 asked 11 months ago

    A problem area map is posted online. Yes, Millgrove Sideroad has been noted as a problem area.

    In general, across the City of Hamilton, automated enforcement has been identified as a possible approach. It’s true that a sign is just a sign. If you provide people with a good route, a good network, they are more likely to use that good network. It will be important to do provide a good, self-enforcing network. There is more and more automated enforcement going on in traffic world. However, in some cases it is up to province to allow whether certain automated enforcement is needed. 

    The project team is working very closely with Hamilton Police in providing best practices for enforcement. Hamilton police is sitting in the Technical Advisory Committee group. They are looking into allocating resources. However, commercial vehicle enforcement involves specialized training for officers. Furthermore, the Federal and Provincial governments are looking into mandating electronic logging devices for long haul trucks as an enforcement tool. 

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    Noise and speed of trucks on roadways: The mere presence of trucks in residential neighbourhoods is problematic. Picture Hamilton’s vision statement, “the best place to raise a child and age successfully”. Imagine a billboard with that vision, with a picture of a child on a house porch with a truck along the street. Hopefully the image speaks for itself. Stand up for the health and welfare of residents. Balance truck traffic needs, but remember that in the end the people matter most.

    Asked at PIC-1 asked 11 months ago

    Noted.

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    I don’t envy your task – it requires a lot of thought, data, and skill to balance competing priorities. It also requires prioritizing healthy communities. Conversely, communities are left to languish, as they have been. - First question: In the presentation, a slide showed many data sources. Will these be available to the public? There are no sources listed that talk about health impacts, such as respiratory disease. Please make it priority to add data sources from medical journals, etc. to give these health impacts the consideration they need. - Second question: A lot of design work was done via the Stoney Creek Urban Boundary Expansion (SCUBE) study. Will that work be part of your data sources as well?

    Asked at PIC-1 asked 11 months ago

    Most of data items and documents listed are available as public documents and can be found online. Some items, e.g. telemetrics data, cannot be shared as we do not have permission to share this sensitive information. GIS data is available on the city’s open.hamilton.ca website where you can have access to those datasets. 

    The consultant is getting guidance from City of Hamilton staff, including guidance from the health field. Our review of best practices also looks at dealing with health and safety issues as they relate to goods movement.

    Re: SCUBE, we are looking at previous studies completed as EAs. We are considering and incorporation the details and recommendations of previously completed projects. This project has a Technical Advisory Group who are contributing from a health and perspective and are advising on air quality issues. Council members have also noted documents for consideration in this project.

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    Who will be monitoring the trucks for speeding?

    Asked at PIC-1 asked 11 months ago

    City of Hamilton Police Services to uphold traffic bylaws. They have assigned officers with devices to monitor speeding trucks and issue tickets for any infractions of the bylaws.

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    I live on Victoria and Cannon – one of the worst intersections in the city when it comes to truck traffic: 24/7/365. My home vibrates, I can taste fumes in the air. I hope change is coming. Trucks on our street impact every element of life. My children go to Davey School, with trucks passing frequently. It seems crazy that we have to deal with this in this day and age. I know it’s hard to know what the end result will be. Will it be wholesale changes, or small incremental changes? In a perfect world, can we expect that trucks will not be coming downtown past hospitals and schools, or can we expect additional signage only? I just want to have a general expectation as to what to expect.

    Asked at PIC-1 asked 11 months ago

    The first question we would ask is, “Does that truck need to be there?” There may be trucks that do need to be there, local deliveries, or construction sites nearby. We talked about types of truck: heavy, medium and light, and perhaps we would deal with whether a certain category of truck should be there.  If you have a denser truck network, you disperse the impacts. If you have fewer, you have more impact on those locations, and also on links in between if they are the most direct route to and from the truck route network. There are a lot of things to consider, not just do we have a sign here or there.