Water, Wastewater, and Stormwater Master Plan

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

The Water, Wastewater and Stormwater (W/WW/SWM) Master Plan is a strategic and comprehensive growth and infrastructure planning study to provide a basis for decision making to shape the City’s future growth.

The W/WW/SWM Master Plan consists of a review of growth projections, servicing policies, design criteria and completion of public consultation and servicing strategy evaluation under the Municipal Engineers Association Class Environmental Assessment Master Plan Process. The population and employment projection inputs are developed by the City planning department under the GRIDS 2 process and will consist of population, employment and densities within existing (Infill/Intensification) areas and new Greenfield growth to 2051.

The study will determine the short and long-term water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure needs to support growth to the year 2051.

The objective of the integrated Master Plans is to:

  • Provide a strategic vision for the next thirty years to accommodate future growth, and ensure safe, clean drinking water and effective environmental protection
  • Ensure safe, sustainable and optimized water and wastewater services
  • Provide a business case for the need, timing and cost of water, wastewater and stormwater services

We want to hear from you!

Public input is an important part of the Class EA process. There are several times throughout the Class EA process where there is opportunity for public and stakeholders to provide their input. For this study public consultation will occur:

  • Early in the process to introduce the study and to get public feedback (Notice of Commencement).
  • Once the alternatives have been evaluated and the preliminary preferred solution has been selected (PIC #2).
  • Once the study is completed the Master Plan Report will be placed on public record for a minimum 30-day review period (Notice of Study Completion).

The Water, Wastewater and Stormwater (W/WW/SWM) Master Plan is a strategic and comprehensive growth and infrastructure planning study to provide a basis for decision making to shape the City’s future growth.

The W/WW/SWM Master Plan consists of a review of growth projections, servicing policies, design criteria and completion of public consultation and servicing strategy evaluation under the Municipal Engineers Association Class Environmental Assessment Master Plan Process. The population and employment projection inputs are developed by the City planning department under the GRIDS 2 process and will consist of population, employment and densities within existing (Infill/Intensification) areas and new Greenfield growth to 2051.

The study will determine the short and long-term water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure needs to support growth to the year 2051.

The objective of the integrated Master Plans is to:

  • Provide a strategic vision for the next thirty years to accommodate future growth, and ensure safe, clean drinking water and effective environmental protection
  • Ensure safe, sustainable and optimized water and wastewater services
  • Provide a business case for the need, timing and cost of water, wastewater and stormwater services

We want to hear from you!

Public input is an important part of the Class EA process. There are several times throughout the Class EA process where there is opportunity for public and stakeholders to provide their input. For this study public consultation will occur:

  • Early in the process to introduce the study and to get public feedback (Notice of Commencement).
  • Once the alternatives have been evaluated and the preliminary preferred solution has been selected (PIC #2).
  • Once the study is completed the Master Plan Report will be placed on public record for a minimum 30-day review period (Notice of Study Completion).

Do you have a question about the project?

All answers will be posted to this website in a timely manner.

loader image
Didn't receive confirmation?
Seems like you are already registered, please provide the password. Forgot your password? Create a new one now.
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Hey there! I'm curious what plans there are for sewage and wastewater management along garner road. I'm a home owner that's been on a septic system for over 50 years and would love to know if there are plans to change. Thank you very kindly, Jonathan

    Jonathan asked 4 months ago

    The Water and Wastewater strategies are still in process and don’t examine individual properties under the Water, Wastewater and Stormwater (W/WW/SWM) Master Plan. The W/WW/SWM Master Plan is being undertaken to develop a comprehensive plan for the growth-related infrastructure requirements for the City of Hamilton. The Master Plan consists of a review of growth projections up to 2051, servicing policies, design criteria, and completion of public consultation and servicing strategy development and evaluation under the Municipal Engineers Association (MEA) Class Environmental Assessment (EA) Process. 

    The City’s updated Growth-Related Infrastructure Development Strategy (GRIDS 2) and Comprehensive Review Report are still under review by the Province. Once the Province approves, the Master Plan process, including the growth plan and the infrastructure upgrade requirements, will go under Public Consultation. All information regarding the W/WW/SWM Master Plan, including Public Consultation Process, will be published on the project webpage as it becomes available. The final Master Plans project file will be posted online with a 30-Day review period to allow all interested stakeholders an opportunity to comment on the final Plans.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    When I drive by recent developments in Hamiltons jurisdiction and see the size of their associated stormwater ponds I often wonder what is the storm event and catchment area that is being used. A back of the envelope calculation quickly shows that they are no way sufficient to hold run off from the entire development. Likely no even the runoff from all the roofs... and then you have driveways and other newly harden surfaces. Isn't the entire purpose of stormwater BMP to ensure that the base flow leaving the site has ZERO difference compared to the pre-development state?

    Dan McDonell asked 7 months ago

    The City’s stormwater management standards and guidelines require that post-development runoff peak flows remain at or below pre-development rates. Today, stormwater management facilities (ponds) are utilized most notably in areas with separated storm sewers. They are sized to control a specific range of storms (between the 2 and 100 year storm condition) with the goal of matching outflow rates under those conditions to the rates identified before the new development was built. Further the ponds also have emergency relief overflow systems for events larger than a 100 year storm. These sizing criteria typically result in pond foot prints which range between 6 and 8 % of the associated drainage area, depending on factors such as land use, pond depth and local grading.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    When the municipality of Hamilton is compared to the other municipalities in the greater golden horseshoe I am always shocked by how far behind we are in using new and better stormwater management BMPs. Why has Hamilton continued to focus on the end of the stormwater pipe issue (multi- million dollar storage tanks) instead of FORCING developers to incorporate newer and better BMPs on the development sites? Such as stormwater grass swales, infiltration parking lots with porous concrete, temp. Infiltration wetlands in the island spaces of parking lots...etc, etc, etc. Instead Hamilton continous to just force the minimum basic standard on developments. (Similar to third world countries)

    Dan McDonell asked 7 months ago

    The City of Hamilton has both an older more complex area of combined sewers as well as a more modern area of separated sewer systems. Solution considerations and opportunities are different for each of these zones. In the older system, more progressive approaches are being evaluated to leverage opportunities where they may be found. Hamilton does have comprehensive stormwater management guidelines which advocate for the application of a combination of end-of-pipe, conveyance and source controls; these are consistent with other progressive municipalities across Southern Ontario. Depending on the location in the City’s watersheds, along with the local requirements for water quality and water quantity management, it may be necessary to apply a suite of best practices to address concerns related to development impacts associated with flooding, erosion, water balance and the natural environment. Furthermore, the City is currently working with the Province and area stakeholders on new Green Standards and Guidelines for Stormwater Management which will build upon the City’s current standards and those of the Province to provide contemporary guidance to the City and its development stakeholders.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Numerous creeks in Dundas are showing MASSIVE erosion and sediment load issues. For example over the past 5 years the dundas Valley trail has slowly been eroded into and 100s of tons of forest soil erodes away yearly. There is ZERO stormwater management in these areas and the stormwater is being DIRECTLY discharged into the creeks. Is the city studying this problem? Will this 16 year old plan be up dated to highlight the historical problems as well as the new growth? Finally why does new development sites in Hamilton the in downtown not include stormwater management?

    Dan McDonell asked 8 months ago

    Erosion is a natural process; what may appear as adverse impacts may, in fact be the natural evolution of a stream system. That said, it is acknowledged that changes in runoff due to urbanization can exacerbate flooding and erosion impacts. This is why the City of Hamilton and the Province require stormwater management (SWM) for all new development, including redeveloping lands. SWM is required to address the impacts on runoff related to both quantity and quality. Many parts of the City, though, were developed before modern SWM became the requirement hence there are numerous locations (mainly in the older areas of the community) where SWM is non-existent. These areas are systematically studied by the City in terms of what potential exists to retrofit the drainage systems in order to mitigate legacy impacts. While the current Stormwater Master Plan’s focus is on developing a plan to mitigate/manage the impacts from new or re-developing lands, other watershed based initiatives, such as the Chedoke Creek Stormwater Retrofit Class Environmental study, will be examining the opportunities for improving legacy drainage areas.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    The GRIDS2 growth plan was presented to GIC and I spoke as a delegate. Urban boundary expansion was rejected by Stop Sprawl advocates. Is the plan being amended to include urban densification as the only option?

    Caroline Hill Smith asked about 1 year ago

    A framework for ‘How Should Hamilton Grow?’ was created by the City of Hamilton, in conjunction with Dillon Consulting, which addresses two growth plan scenarios for the City: An Ambitious Density Scenario, which includes approximately 1,340 hectares of an Urban Boundary Expansion by identifying new Greenfield growth, as well as infill and intensification areas within the existing City core, and a no Urban Boundary Expansion scenario which considers growth strictly within the existing Urban Area, focusing on infill and intensification within local communities. 

    A special General Issues Committee (GIC) meeting is planned for October 2021 that will identify whether an Urban Boundary Expansion is supported. This decision will be based on a detailed and comprehensive review of the Lands Needs Assessment and public input.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Will this next waste water plan include proper holding facilities to prevent overflow from going into watershed? Previous plans seem to overlook this important aspect! Is city preparing for increased storm activity and rainfall amounts? Will it be done right this time?

    JACK asked about 1 year ago

    The potential impacts of climate change and wet weather events on the water, wastewater, and stormwater systems will be considered and evaluated through the Master Plan. In order to support the consideration of the natural environment in the growth plan, the Master Plan team will review and assess available information related to the City’s natural systems and proximity to the identified growth areas. A high-level environmental review will be completed through a screening of environmental features and functions as part of the evaluation of servicing strategies.  

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Why was the first meeting cancelled. Doesn't this put you behind schedule.

    Kggonnsen asked over 1 year ago

    As per the Master Planning guidelines outlined by the Municipal Class Environment Environmental Assessment Process, a single Public Information Centre (PIC) is required to complete the study, but the City has planned to schedule at least two PICs later in the process to present project information and preferred alternative being considered in the Master Plan within the project schedule. The Master Plan study is ongoing, and information and recommendations will be published on both the project webpage and Engage Hamilton websites as it becomes available.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Tiffany Creek runs through my property. There is also a storm water outlet that drains into my pond. Storm water carries a significant amount of garbage, primarily plastic onto my creek bed and property after every rainfall event. Are there any provisions for trapping, stopping or cleaning up the mess?

    Mike Martin asked over 1 year ago

    The Stormwater Master Plan will review all existing stormwater infrastructure as it relates to the potential growth areas identified. Any opportunities to optimize or upgrade the current infrastructure will be considered and analyzed throughout the project.  

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Where will I find the Map of the Water, Wastewater and Stormwater plans

    Bobb asked over 1 year ago

    All information regarding the Water, Wastewater and Stormwater Master Plans will be published on the project webpage as it becomes available. The Engage Hamilton webpage will continue to allow the public to provide comments and ask questions about new information. The final Master Plans project file will be posted online with a 30-Day review period to allow all interested stakeholders an opportunity to comment on the final Plans.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Will the stormwater master plan include sub-watershed planning for Ancaster? I live in an older neighbourhood and am concerned about the ability of the stormwater system to handle the extra stormwater resulting from redevelopment and intensification. Thank you.

    Beth Goodger asked over 1 year ago

    The Stormwater Master Plan will review all existing and future stormwater infrastructure needs as it relates to the potential growth areas identified within the urban boundary expansion.

Page last updated: 02 Aug 2022, 02:27 PM